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Season Info

Side by Side by Sondheim
Music and Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim
and Music by Leonard Bernstein, Richard Rogers, & Jule Styne


Stephanie Truitt, Todd Nielsen, Eileen T'Kaye,
Scott Stevenson, and Sandra Kinder


Director
Producer
Choreographers

Musical Director
Scenic Designer
Lighting Designer
Property Master
Costume Designer
Assistant Director
Stage Manager
Technical Director
 


Bob Ari
Barbara Beckley
Bob Ari
Todd Nielsen
Marjory Poe
Jim Yarmer
Jamie McAllister
Robert Canning
Karen Weller
Julie Abdala
Joyce Killingswroth
Robert Budaska
The Company

Scott Stevensen, Eileen T’Kaye, Todd Nielsen, Stephanie Truitt, Sandra Kinder


First Pianist
Second Pianist
Understudies

Marjorie Poe
Jan Powell
Vince Acosta and Katherine Lench
Musical Numbers

ACT I

Comedy Tonight
Love is in the Air
Comedy Tonight
Getting Married Today
 

The Little Things
I Remember
You Must Meet My Wife

Can That Boy Foxtrot

Company
Another Hundred People
Barcelona

Marry Me a Little
Too Many Mornings

I Never Do Anything Twice
Beautiful Girls

Ah Paree!
Buddy’s Blues
Broadway Baby
You’re Gonna Love Tomorrow
 

The Company
The Company
The Company
Stephanie
Scott
Eileen
The Company
Todd
Scott
Eileen
Eileen
Stephanie
The Company
Eileen
Todd
Eileen
Stephanie
Scott
Stephanie
Sandra
Scott
The Company
Eileen
Todd
Stephanie
The Company

ACT II

Everybody Says Don’t
Anyone Can Whistle
Send in the Clowns
We’re Gonna Be All Right

You Could Drive a Person Crazy
 

A Boy Like That
I Have a Love
The Boy From
Pretty Lady
 

You Gotta Get a Gimmick
 

Being Alive
Losing My Mind
Now
Could I Leave You
I’m Still Here
Conversation Piece
Side By Side By Side
 

The Company
Scott
Eileen
Scott
Eileen
Todd
Eileen
Stephanie
Eileen
Stephanie
Eileen
Scott
Todd
Stephanie
Eileen
Stephanie
Scott
Todd
Stephanie
Now
Eileen
Sandra
The Company
The Company

Stephan Sondheim


Stephan Sondheim is, indisputably, the reigning composer-lyricist of the contemporary American musical theatre. No event is more anticipated in any Broadway season than the opening of a new Sondheim show.

He was born in New York City, and attended Williams College where he majored in music. As an undergraduate he gained a certain celebrity on campus by writing the book, music, and lyrics for two college shows. His first professional job after graduation was writing scripts for the Topper television series. He made his Broadway debut in 1956 with the incidental music for Girls of Summer, but it was in the following year that he first commanded major attention with the lyrics for West Side Story and, after that, Gypsy.
In 1962, Sondheim emerged as a composer as well as a lyricist, with the score for A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum. Subsequently, he created the music and lyrics for Anyone Can Whistle, Company, Follies, A Little Night Music, Pacific Overatures, Sweeney Todd, Merrily We Roll Along, Sunday in the Park with George, and Into the Woods, as well as the lyrics for Do I Hear a Waltz?, and additional lyrics for Candide. These works have received an astounding 11 Tony nominations for Best Musical, as well as four New York Drama Critics’ Circle awards and a Pulitzer Prize for Drama. His music and lyrics have been honored with five Tony awards.

In addition to his work in the theatre, he composed the film scores for Stavisky and Reds, songs for the television production Evening Primrose, co-authored (with Anthony Perkins) the film The Last of Sheila, and, for a time, created crossword puzzles for the New York Times Magazine.
He is a council member of the Dramatists Guild and served as its president from 1973 to 1981. In 1983 he was elected to the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters.

People ask me why I continue writing for the stage. The answer is simple: the theatre is the only dramatic medium that acknowledges the presence of an audience. Movies do not. If you boo at a movie screen, they go right on acting. If you laugh, they won’t stop for you. You have no effect on them and you know it from the minute you sit down. In the theatre you’re aware that the community experience exists between the stage and you. And that’s what’s unique about it.

 — Stephen Sondheim
 

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