Almost, Maine

by John Cariani

Almost Maine
Louis Lotorto, Caroline Kinsolving, and Dee Ann Newkirk


Director
Set Design
Lighting Design
Set Dressing & Properties Design
Costume Design
Sound Design
Production Stage Manager
Marketing/Public Relations
Technical Director
Set Constructions
Lighting Crew


Lead Scenic Artist
Light Board Operator
Stage Crew

Covert Art
Photographs


David Rose
David Potts
Jeremy Pivnic
MacAndMe
A. Jeffrey Schoenberg
John Zalewski
Leesa Freed
David Elzer/Demand PR
Robert T. Kyle
Pro Sets West, Inc.
A.C. Bradshaw
James King
Carter Weathers
Alex Calle
Kathryn Horan
Andrew Dean
M.E. McElveney
Ricky Vodka
Michael Lamont


Featuring


Prologue

Pete ..... Louis
Ginette ..... Dee Ann

Act One

Episode 1: Her Heart
East ..... Donald
Glory ..... Caroline

Episode 2: Sad and Glad
Jimmy ..... Louis
Sandrine ..... Dee Ann
Waitress ..... Caroline

Episode 3: This Hurts
Marvalyn ..... Dee Ann
Steve ..... Donald

Episode 4: Getting it Back
Gayle ..... Caroline
Lendall ..... Louis










Interlogue

Pete ..... Louis

Episode 5: They Fell
Randy ..... Donald
Chad ..... Louis

Episode 6: Where it Went
Phil ..... Donald
Marci ..... Caroline

Episode 7: Story of Hope
Hope ..... Dee Ann
Man ..... Louis

Episode 8: Seeing the Thing
Rhonda ..... Caroline
Dave ..... Donald









Epilogue

Pete ..... Louis
Ginette ..... Dee Ann


PLACE

Various locales in Almost, Maine, a small town in Northern Maine that doesn’t quite exist.


TIME

The present. Everything takes place at nine o’clock on a cold, clear, moonless, slightly surreal Friday night in the middle of the deepest part of a Northern Maine winter.

Notes from the Playwright

Things you should know about Maine and Almost, Maine:

Maine, the eastern-most and northeastern-most state in the United States, is the largest state in New England. It comprises almost half of New England’s total land area, but has only 9% of the region’s population -

1.3 million people. The most sparsely populated state east of the Mississippi River, Maine has only 40 people per square mile. (Consider this: Vermont has 65 people per square mile; California has 234.) However, Mainers don't despair: Maine has more moose per square mile than any other state. This shouldn't be too surprising when you consider that Maine is the most forested state in the country: It is 90% woods!

Were it to exist, Almost, Maine would be located in the remote heart of Aroostook (say, “uh-ROO-stick”) County, the northernmost county in Maine. Aroostook is the largest county east of the Mississippi River: It is almost as big as the state of Massachusetts and is considerably larger than Connecticut and Rhode Island put together. With a population of about 72,000, and only 11 people per square mile, Aroostook has the same population density as the Dakotas.

Unorganized territories make up more than half of Maine's total land area. Almost “is” located in the heart of this unorganized territory, in what is officially designated as Township Thirteen, Range Seven, or T13-R7. T13-R7 is seventy-five miles northwest of the northern terminus of Interstate 95; two hundred miles northwest of the ocean (at its closest); and 450 miles north of Boston, MA. It is obviously far away from things.

Winters in Almost, Maine are long and cold: It feels like winter from October to May. Average temperature in January is 9 degrees Fahrenheit. (On January 22 of this year, it was -34!) Average July temperature:

65. Average annual snowfall is 110 inches. (It seems quite appropriate, then, that one of Maine's two U.S. Senators is Olympia Snowe. Senator Snowe. For real!)

On the northern lights:

National Geographic once printed something to this effect: “They call Montana ‘Big Sky Country.’ Well ... ‘they’ haven’t seen Northern Maine.” Northern Maine’s big,

open sky and wide open spaces make for prime viewing of the northern lights (aurora borealis) -- the brilliant, ribbon-like, otherworldly displays of light that are most common in the Arctic. Northern Mainers are fortunate: They live just inside the southernmost tip of a ring defining the area in which the northern lights regularly appear. Growing up, I remember being treated to a northern lights show at least once a year.

The northern lights occur when atoms become “excited.” During solar storms, electrons are sent streaming towards the earth. As these electrons enter the earth’s atmosphere, they strike and excite atoms, ionizing them -- charging them by knocking out an electron. When this happens to enough atoms, the brilliant, colorful light display that is the aurora borealis hovers and streaks across the sky. When the aurora fades, it’s because the affected atoms have returned to their grounded state. Almost, Maine is a play about people who are normally very grounded, but who have become very excited by love ... and other extraordinary occurrences. I hope you enjoy it. And I hope you believe that places like Almost, Maine exist.

John Cariani
January 22, 2008


SPECIAL THANKS

Jean Bergman, Derek Bjorenson, Brad Brown, Jim Call, Lillian Eisenberg, Chris Garr,
Kayla Girling, Herb Kaplan, Charlie Napp, Wally Shapiro, Amy Sosa, Eula Warren